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The Orlando Innamorato Matteo Maria Boiardo

The Orlando Innamorato

Matteo Maria Boiardo

Published
ISBN : 9781230213156
Paperback
54 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1823 edition. Excerpt: ... cite, in illustrationMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1823 edition. Excerpt: ... cite, in illustration of this, his description of a storm at sea, which has been often deemed burlesque, but in which the poet would be more justly considered as working a fine effect by unwonted means. Let us try this question by the rules of analogy. Men in all countries resemble one another in the main, and where they are not guided by a natural taste and judgment, lean upon some rule, which is to direct them as an infallible guide. Depending upon this, they seldom consider that it may be narrow, or of insufficient support. Thus an Englishman who has learned to think about verse, by the help of a few simple precepts *, which he believes * For example, there is no rule deemed more absolute, and yet there is none which admits more exceptions than the maxim forbidding a line of ten monosyllables. For monosyllables, in French and English, are often such only to the eye, such words being frequently, in both languages, melted into each other. Hence many good English verses consist of to be absolute, is taught to look upon the double rhyme as suited only to burlesque poetry. Yet Drummonds Methought desponding nightingales did borrow, Plaint of my plaint, and sorrow of my sorrow- and the description of him, who Saw with wonder, Vast magazines of ice and piles of thunder, * might be cited to prove what widely different effects are produced by the same weapon, as it s differently wielded. But, impressed with the notions of the laws of verse which I have specified, that is, not knowing that almost all such ten words, as that of Dryden, which will be in the recollection of every body, Arms and the man I sing, &c. and the French cite as beautiful a line of Racine, which is composed of twelve, Lej ur nest pas plus pur que le fond de...