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A Shorter Working Day Robert Abbott Hadfield

A Shorter Working Day

Robert Abbott Hadfield

Published September 3rd 2010
ISBN : 9781178229530
Paperback
214 pages
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 About the Book 

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER II. HISTORY OF THE MOVEMENT IN ENGLAND. II. De B. G.] EarlyMorePurchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER II. HISTORY OF THE MOVEMENT IN ENGLAND. II. De B. G.] Early Times?Thorold Rogers Statements?Thomas More?The Beginning of the Nineteenth Century?The Factory Acts?The Trades Unions Agitation?Growth of the Movement?The New Unionism?The Dundee Congress?The Liverpool and Newcastle Congresses?The May-Day Demonstrations?The Deputation to Lord Salisbury?Mr. Gladstone and the Movement. Appendix: The Interview with Mr. Gladstone.] g 1. Early Times. The movement for a shorter working day is after all no new thing, but rather a recurrence to a state of things which prevailed in earlier centuries. If we are to accept the statements of Professor Thorold Rogers, the artisan and labourer of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries only worked eight hours per day as a rule, and were paid for overtime. As Professor Rogers statement has been severely criticized by other economists, it may be well perhaps to give it in his actual words.1 The winters wages are about 25 per cent. less than those of other seasons, but the winter seems to have been limited to the months of December and January. This fact, which I have frequently noticed, is proof that the hours of labour were not long. They seem 1 S1. Le1turifs of rork and Wages, pp. l o, 542. to have been not more than eight hours per day, and at a later period in the history of labour the eight hours day seems to be indicated by the fact that extra hours are paid for at such a rate as corresponds to the ordinary pay per hour for eight hours, being a little in excess. Hence the artisan, if he were minded to do so, would have time during summer for some ag1icultural employment- it would seem that this occupation for spare time was not unusual, for I have found employers of artisans occasionally purchasing agricultu...